Ottawa-Temiskaming Highland Trail Back To Trail List

In order to make our trail tracks more user friendly, and cross platform, we have now converted to the widely accepted GPX format. The gpx format is compatible with virtually all gps units and gps software. The gps files shown below are compressed "zipped" gpx files.

Save to your local drive and unzip to your choice of directory for upload using appropriate gps software


TRAIL DESCRIPTION

This trail is more rugged than trails in Killarney or Algonquin Parks.There are not a lot of sections over rough ground, but you go up and down plenty of hills. A family of four, consisting of mother, father, twelve year old daughter and fourteen year old son, hiked the eighty four kilometre section from Latchford to the Rabbit Lake Road in six days. Two men in their seventies have done the trail. We have also had people give up half way through. My favourite time to hike the trail is in May when the snow is gone and before the bugs appear.Ten out of twelve hikes in May have turned out fine weather wise. One hike had too much rain and another had a one day blizzard that melted the next day. September and the first half of October are the second best time to hike this trail. When camping along the trail in summer I always like to camp near a lake or stream suitable for swimming.

Staying on Trail

For the most part we have been complimented on how well marked the trail is.However in summer you will have to be very observant to keep on track. Here is a list of the things that you should keep in mind. The trail is marked with white paint blazes and where there are no trees with orange ribbons and on open rock sections with rock cairns. The trail route has no blazes on the section from the Matabitchuan Power House to Beaver Mountain. This is a wide corridor made by Hydro.Recently we have had to deal with hundreds of balsam fir and spruce killed by the spruce bud worm that have been falling over the trail.Some sections of trail that appear open in May dissappear under a cloak of ferns by mid June. Some open sections beside streams and beaver ponds that are easy to follow fill in with raspberry canes and other plants as summer progresses. The white paint blazes are not as bright in the maple forests. When hiking in a group I've noticed that people who talk a lot often go off track.I have hiked the trail at night from the Matabitchuan River to Latchford using a head lamp. The northern section of the trail gets more use and clearing, because it has many sections we do on day hikes.

Access

The following roads as of July 2016 are accessable by car. Highway Eleven, Roosevelt Road North and South end, the extension of Highway 567 (which is maintained by Hydro), Rabbit Lake Road and McConnell Lake Road-McLaren's Bay Road. There are also many points accessable by boat along Lake Temiskaming.

Shuttle Service

Doug Adams (of Northland Paradise Lodge) in Temagami at 705-569-3791 or call Murray at 705-648-3310.

Campsite Information

Order the guide book for detailed information on camping or call Murray Muir at 705-648-3310.

The intervals between campsites are listed in the image shown at the bottom of the page.

Donations

We only have a small crew trying to keep open two hundred kilometres of trails. Your help in trail clearing or donations to Nastawgan Trails would be greatly appreciated.

Cell Phones

They work from many of the hill tops and along the shore of Lake Temiskaming, but don't count on them for emergency help or usefullness in many places along the trail.

Water Sources

The following is a list of water sources that we have found still dependable after a dry summer. Starting from the Rabbit Lake Road and heading north to Latchford. Owain Creek, Grand Campment Creek,Lake Temiskaming, Owl Creek, Temiskaming at Nagle Bay, Fall Creek or the two ponds that feed the stream, Aaron Creek, Low Down Creek, Copper Lake, Matabitchuan River, Gorrie Lake, Little Mountain Lake, Price's Lake, Snort Lake, Friday Creek and Lake, Cliff Lake, Red Pine Pond, Bryan Lake, Roosevelt Lake, Rib Lake, Reade Lake, Hearst Lake, and the Montreal River at Latchford.

TRAIL PHOTOS